Friday, November 2, 2018

MIT Black Student Union at 50 Years



BSU members began helping recruit black students in 1968.
In 1972, assistant director of admissions John A. Mims
and two MIT student guides (left)
welcome students visiting from 23 high schools.

Photo courtesy of the MIT Museum


The BSU at 50
The Black Students' Union marks a half-century of making MIT more diverse.

Alice Waugh  |  MIT Alumni Association
October 30, 2018

Published by the MIT New Office


In 1968, the black student community at MIT was small and needed a way to amplify its voice. Formed during that tumultuous year in political and racial history in the U.S., the MIT Black Students’ Union (BSU) launched a journey of advocacy and community that now continues 50 years later.

In the late 1960s, about 11 percent of Americans were black, but each 1,000-member class at MIT had perhaps half a dozen black students. Galvanized by the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., black student groups were forming at overwhelmingly white college campuses across the country, and MIT was no exception. The students who started MIT BSU had two goals in mind: to support each other and to bring more black students to the Institute. “Surely there were more than three blacks in the high school class of 1965 who could belong to the MIT tribe,” says Linda C. Sharpe ’69, one of the BSU founders, who is a past president of the MIT Alumni Association and a former MIT Corporation member.

In fall of 1968, the new group drew up and presented a list of recommendations to the MIT administration: increasing the number of black students, creating a pre-­enrollment summer program for minority students, and hiring more minority faculty members. In response, MIT established the Task Force on Educational Opportunity (TFEO), which was made up of a group of BSU representatives and MIT administrators and chaired by associate provost (and future MIT president) Paul Gray ’54, SM ’55, ScD ’60. Through a series of often intense discussions, the TFEO designed the summer program, called Project Interphase, and came up with more inclusive approaches to things like recruitment, admissions, and financial aid.

“The Institute rolled up its sleeves and attacked [the recommendations] in the MIT way — that is, being very analytical about what the challenges and problems were, and then trying to figure out solutions to those challenges,” says founding BSU co-chair Shirley Ann Jackson ’68, PhD ’73, who went on to become the first black woman to earn a PhD from MIT and is now the president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a life member of the MIT Corporation. “That doesn’t mean there wasn’t great emotion around it, because there really, really was on all sides.”

Other key players in the birth of the BSU were founding cochair James Turner, PhD ’71, Jennifer Rudd ’68, Charles Kidwell ’69, Nathan Seely ’70, Sekazi Mtingwa ’71, Fred Johnson ’72, and Ronald Mickens, who was a postdoctoral associate in physics.

(This is only an excerpt from the main article which can be found at the MIT News web presence.)



5 comments:

  1. African Diaspora

    The diaspora of developing countries are a potent force for development. The African diaspora achieves this through remittances, promotion of trade, investments, research, innovation, and knowledge and technology transfers. Some African countries are pursuing policies to develop links with Africans abroad and actively encourage them to return to use their skills, knowledge, and financial capital …

    ReplyDelete
  2. Technology that is needed in all the world and in the future, is the technology. whose more than knowledge about technology. The more progress he can make. And it is necessary to have knowledge of every human technology. Because now everything is through technology. You can find help on galido.net for any kind of technology related information. Here are all information about all types of technology and tips.

    Click here to know more information Tech Blogs

    ReplyDelete
  3. TechnologyTechnology is constantly changing. It is an industry that moves so fast, things can become obsolete within weeks. Thus it is essential to always stay on top of news and information, whether it be by newsletter, following RSS feeds and blogs, tutorials or going back to school.

    Click here to know more information Tech Blogs

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am Mariam,from what I can read. It has been sad news and scam to everyone about Voodoo casters or so. But to me they are so real because one worked for me not quite long ago.i met this man on a blog his name is Dr Abalaka is a very powerful man.I traveled down to where his shrine his and we both did the ritual and sacrifice.he had no website yet but he promised to create one as costumers are requesting for it, and now i'm free from the powders of sickness.I don't know about you but Voodoo is real;love marriage,finance, job promotion ,lottery Voodoo,poker voodoo,golf Voodoo,Law & Court case Spells,money voodoo,weigh loss voodoo,diabetic voodoo,hypertensive voodoo,high cholesterol voodoo,Trouble in marriage,Barrenness(need a child),Luck, Money Spells,he also cure any cancer and HIV,it's all he does. I used my money to purchase everything he used he never collected a dime from. He told me I can repay him anytime with anything from my heart. Now I don't know how to do that. If you can help or you need his help write him on (dr.abalaka@outlook.com) and also his cell number: 760-935-3804 you can text him because he use to be very busy some times,i believe that your story will change for better,or if you have any question you can contact me here as mariambaurice@gmail.com best of luck.

    ReplyDelete